An explanation for the Knowledge-Information-Record ecology

I have a hypothesis … a working theory (WARNING: Live knowledge work!) that an analogy from nature could help explain the Knowledge-Information-Record ecology, from a Same-and-Different perspective.

This is a view that is not about a hierarchy, where you attempt to resolve questions like: Is Information a subset of Knowledge? Or is Knowledge a subset of Information? This is a different and maybe fresh perspective.

If you are reading this and need to answer the question now about ‘Why would I care about these differences?‘ then jump down to the section entitled “How the distinction might be useful“. If you are still figuring out the ‘What’ it is that you might care about, then keep reading.

Starting with physics

In nature, H20 is a substance that can exist in different forms or phases: Gas, Liquid and Solid. Or as we more commonly say: Steam, Water, and Ice.  There are processes that transition such substances between these phases, e.g. freezing and condensation.

Here is a perspective that recognises Related yet Separate entities: Related = Water; Separate = Solid, Liquid, Gas.

How might this be applied to Knowledge-Information-Record?  How about:
Solid = Records/Archives – as something ‘tangible’ that can be touched/seen; is preserved
Liquid = Information – as something still ‘tangible’ that can be seen; is an input or output of process
(A tangential thought: Droplets = Data – the small bits that come together to make Information)
Gas  = Knowledge – as something less tangible; not seen directly; inferred by its effect on things; very fuzzy boundaries; more problematic to contain and capture

Does that resonate with you?

Changing Form

Science gives us six phase transitions that happen to the Forms of Solid, Liquid and Gas.

              sublimation                             deposition
SOLID  ============>  GAS    ==============> SOLID

              melting                                    freezing
SOLID  ============>  LIQUID  =============>  SOLID

            condensation                          vapourisation
GAS  =============>   LIQUID  =============> GAS

Cognitive equivalents for these phase transitions might be:
Sublimation = reading, thinking and memorising about the content of a record
Deposition = reflecting and working out loud to elicit inner thoughts and record them directly as something concrete and immutable
Melting =  reading and talking about the content of a record
Freezing = talking and writing with others to make the content of a record
Condensation = speaking, showing, writing about your knowledge to make it transportable outside of you
Vapourisation = listening, learning, doing, observing as you take in the knowledge of others and what is around you to ‘store’ it inside you
NB: I didn’t specify ‘inside you’ as your head or mind. Some of your knowledge may be residing in other parts of your body! And that’s a whole other conversation for another day.

There’s an interesting relationship to explore here in comparing these phase transitions with Nonaka & Takeuchi’s SECI model (1995).  For the uninitiated, SECI stands for Socialisation – sharing tacit knowledge tacitly through shared experience or in face-to-face communication utilising practical examples; Externalisation – converting tacit knowledge to explicit knowledge that is in forms that others can read/listen/watch and interpret for themselves; Combination – combining explicit knowledge with other explicit knowledge to create new forms and concepts that can be analysed and organised anew; and Internalisation – understanding and taking in explicit knowledge so that it becomes an individual’s own internal and tacit knowledge.

I leave it to you to explore and make up your own mind about such a relationship.

Defining Form

Another useful construct about each of the phases has to do with shape and volume:  A Solid has a definite shape and volume. A Liquid has a definite volume but it takes the shape of a container in which is resides. A Gas expands freely filling whatever space is available regardless of the quantity.

A Record is fixed; it has a definite form and volume because it captures the cognitive substance to be immutable, a static preservation at a moment in time.  Information is more fluid it has a definite volume but can change shape based on context and utility. Knowledge is amorphous it definitely exists but is hard to see or touch as something discrete or distinct from its surroundings.

How the distinction might be useful

Making such a distinction between Knowledge, Information and Records, and thus Knowledge Management, Information Management and Records Management, might provide useful clarification about differing expertise, differing and related problem spaces and thus fit-for-purpose solutions.

When you think of the different forms of water, it’s relatively easy to think of different roles for attending to each form, e.g. a Gas Engineer compared to a Water Engineer. Also easy to consider the use of different methods, technology and containers for storing gas (or steam) compared to water/liquid and ice (or frozen stuff).

I don’t have the answers for how you might think about the role of a Knowledge Manager compared to a Records Manager, or an Information Manager.  By sharing this concept, I simply intend to catalyse a fresh and potentially useful conversation.

Where will you take this knowledge?

Reference

Nonaka, I. and Takeuchi, H. (1995). The knowledge-creating company. New York, Oxford: Oxford University Press.

 

Helen Palmer is Founder of RHX Group, a boutique agency that partners with people who want to make change in how they work with information and knowledge.  She thinks critically about knowledge work, and how to ensure knowledge isnt wasted. She revels in making small changes that disrupt the way people think and what they do.

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12 things every knowledge worker should know how to do

As a knowledge worker you are a site of production. You are ‘plant and machinery’. You are a knowledge ‘engine’. Your capability and capacity for knowledge work is a function of the condition of YOU and the conditions you create for yourself. What should you know how to do to be the best functioning knowledge engine?

Here’s a list of twelve things.

Manage self

1. Know your own learning style/preferences (try Felder and Silverman’s Index of Learning Styles); your personal knowledge management style (try Six Cs of Personal Knowledge Management by Straits Knowledge).
2. Know your strengths and what to do to play to these (try Clifton Strengths Finder).
3. Use personal resources like Time, Attention, Energy and Relationships effectively (try Activity Time Budget, Honest Digital Calendar, Attention Filter).

Manage information

4. Title documents meaningfully – follow a naming convention that makes good sense. Use Properties and meta-data whenever you can to enrich the information, and enable quick easy discovery.
5. Setup, maintain and use an information organisation system; both for a collection of items, and with the structure within a single item. (i.e. Headings/Sections, Table of Contents, Cross Referencing, etc.).
6. Curate information; manage a collection of useful resources for self and/or others.

Develop knowledge

7. Use reflective practice including after-action reviews, to Think about what you’ve done and what could be done and what you are going to do.
8. Set an intention and test hypothesis; experiment to gain insights. Sometimes you need to Act to discover useful Thoughts.
9. Summarise and distil a set of knowledge (try Notebooking or Mindmapping).
10. Recognise knowledge creation and distribution opportunities and leverage them.

Produce knowledge

11. Create produced knowledge to address different learning styles, with communication medium appropriate for the audience.
12. Package knowledge creatively for production/publication (e.g. document, presentation, slides, session outline).

Learn more about Develop knowledge and Produce knowledge phases in knowledge creation.

If you can do all these, you have the foundations for being knowledge-savvy.

 

Helen Palmer is Founder of RHX Group, a boutique agency that partners with people who want to make change in how they work with information and knowledge.  She thinks critically about knowledge work, and how to ensure knowledge isn’t wasted. She revels in making small changes that disrupt the way people think and what they do.

 

Creatively packaging knowledge

A common response to the risk of losing knowledge is to capture or document it.  This is a worthy activity. However, how often is what is captured or documented, actually read or used? One factor may be the format or medium used to present the knowledge. This blog presents some creative  ways you might package knowledge to make it appealing, and more importantly easy to digest and thus apply.

A selection

* Recipe metaphor

One expertise I have and use is in designing and leading the change process for an organisational change.  I like to employ creative ways of engaging with people in change to providing a meaningful experience while also addressing their wellbeing (physical, mental and emotional).  I redefined a ‘go-live preparation’ activity using the analogy of air travel.  In order to share the idea with other practitioners, I used the metaphor of a recipe to explain the essential elements and thus enable others to easily replicate and even adapt the idea for other contexts.

Sample ‘Fly away together – change activity’

* Game show presentation

When the opportunity arose to present a client case-study at a conference on ‘managing change (as a designed user experience)’ , I gave the conference participants their own user experience with a game-show format. I packaged the knowledge of the case study into 12 mini packages (1 slide, 3-4 min of talking points) that become elements of the game-show. The audience chose from the 12 about the aspects of the case study they were most interested in.

Sample ‘Managing change as a designed user experience’ [45 min audio with video of the slide deck]

* Graphical resume with timeline

Somebody has already down the work of curating a small collection of resumes to inspire doing things differently. A key idea is turning your chronological work history into a graphical timeline.

Samples ‘7 Cool Resumes Found on Pinterest’

* Graphical rich report of survey results

Kea New Zealand exists to connect ‘talented Kiwis and Friends of New Zealand’ around the world. (I’m a Kiwi!) One of their activities is to survey expatriates to understand their choices about living away from NZ and engaging with NZ from a distance.  The 2013 report of this survey is visually rich in graphics, colour and icons. How more compelling is this to read and understand than pages of prose, plain tables and bullet points?

Sample ‘Kea Every Kiwi Counts 2013 Report’

* Advice about better practice in an infographic

There are often arguments that if you want to motivate people to change their behaviour you need to offer social proof; or use facts and figures; or use colourful images. Here is an example combining all of these.

Sample ‘Taking Breaks at Work’

Other advice includes provide a compelling narrative (aka story); or a large dose of humour that might trigger awareness of a reality we haven’t been prepared to face – we are laughing at ourselves!

Sample ‘How to lead a creative Life’

* Graphic recording of group conversation

One master of the art of graphic recording is Lynne Cazaly. She offers a worthwhile and recommended learning sessions called ‘Catch-It’. Learn how to visually think and record the conversation of a group in real-time. Rather than read about this – experience it!

Sample ‘Video showing graphic recording by Lynne’ (1:45 min)

Recommended reading

These references in my collection have been a source of inspiration and practical guidance to me in creatively packaging knowledge. .

I hope this selection has got your creative juices humming. As a knowledge worker we often create knowledge products – let’s find and use ways to do this innovatively.  I hope you will share other examples you have created or have seen.

Helen Palmer is Principal Consultant at RHX Group. She thinks critically about knowledge work and how to ensure knowledge isn’t wasted. She revels in tackling the big processes of change and learning, so that ideas become impact. With her colleagues at RHX Group, Helen helps teams make better use of their people, knowledge and information.

Image credit: Microsoft Online Clipart

Fourth dimension of networking – Making it happen (Part 3)

I have shared knowledge about the ‘What’ of my 4D networking practice. This post outlines the details of ‘How’ by answering the question: What enables a savvy 4D networker?

Below is a set of three lists: Practices I do, Tools I use, Mindsets I hold. I encourage you to reflect on these and prepare your own lists.

Practices

This is a list of things I do with my ‘Networking’ time.

  • Connect only with 3D or 4D contacts in visible online databases (i.e. LinkedIn)
  • 3D & 4D networking, based on my own 4D criteria
  • Act thoughtfully and purposefully
  • Ask individuals: How can I help you? What is your passion or interest?
  • Think proactively: How can I help this person? (Do 4D activities); Who can I connect this person with? (e.g. Utilise my trusted contacts)
  • Endorse or recommend people without prompting
  • Ask for assistance to meet new people
  • Treasure chestFollow-up after meetings to give something meaningful, show appreciation, or spread the word/tell others
  • Catalyse discussions (online or in person) with interesting questions
  • Being active participant in an Professional Association or Community of Practice
  • Schedule and honour regular networking time/activity
  • Use digital calendar to manage availability and issue shared calendar entries for meetings
  • Keep a record of my contacts and my engagement with them (contact details, personal details, my reflections on initial meeting with them, suggestions for how I can assist them or connect more meaningfully, email correspondence).
  • Keep current records so I can do summary reports/analysis about breadth & depth of my activity over time, e.g. who I saw, how many people I meet, number of contacts in my databases, and evaluate performance
  • Adapt: Review what’s working or not working and do something again or differently
  • Learn from others lessons-learnt, e.g. Mistakes not to make using LinkedIn.
  • Consider: What presence will I show up with when meeting with someone?
  • Implement 4C’s filter: give varying degrees of attention to interact with individuals or groups
  • Observe or imagine what others might value; scan/seek for items and opportunities to share with others
  • Write on back of business cards and noting person’s interests & preferences immediately after meeting someone. (This later gets transferred to digital records.)
  • Tagging/classifying people into meaningful groups for interaction – makes it easier to execute contact with collections of people.
  • Capture valuable information so I can act quickly to share something of value (see Notebook lists under Tools below)
  • Prepare or acquire micro-blog (i.e. Twitter, LinkedIn update) content I can publish quickly and constantly
  • Do regular micro-blogging to share and mobilise useful or inspiring knowledge

Tools

This is the set of tool I use that enables the practices listed above.

  • Contacts database (online = e.g. LinkedIn; offline = e.g. Outlook Contacts – I have both because approx 10% of my contacts are not LinkedIn members)
  • Tagging schema to organise contacts in my databases
  • Linking micro-blog posting across online platforms, i.e. LinkedIn feeds to Twitter feeds to Facebook
  • Sample text for replying to various message correspondence scenarios, e.g. LinkedIn member who I don’t know (i.e. not 3D or 4D contact) invites me to connect with them
  • Social media professional profiles with connections so others can learn about me and my network (e.g. LinkedIn – Basic is sufficient, Basic is free; Twitter; Facebook)
  • Bio copy prepared for various audiences
  • High quality professional colour digital photograph
  • Links in email signature of available methods to contact me
  • List of my interests, specialities and passions that I can share
  • Notebook entries of useful lists: Quotes, recommendations, insights, suggestions, humour, random acts of kindness to do
  • Notebook entries with potential & finalised micro-blog content I can publish
  • Artefacts/methods to send a surprising delightful message: Quality cards, or notepaper. I also use origami paper made into objects, and handwritten emails using inking on tablet laptop.

Mindsets

These ideas I hold to guide my networking and professional practice. They underpin the practices listed above.

  • It’s better to give than to receive.
  • Pay it forward.
  • For everything there is a season, a time for every activity under heaven.
  • Be prudent and purposeful with resources
  • Don’t enable the waste or potential of talent.
  • Its okay to say No. It’s okay to stop.
  • Its okay to ask.
  • Respect others time and energy.
  • Honour my own boundaries and limits.
  • Aim for effective not efficient activity.
  • Leave something better than you found it.
  • Its not what I do or say but how I make people feel.
  • Make the first approach, take the first step.
  • Show up.
  • Mean what I say, say what I mean.
  • Honour my word and commitments.

May you find meaningful ways to perform better in professional networking.
Please share with me your ways and means!

Helen Palmer is Principal Consultant at RHX GroupHelen likes to experiment and create conceptual frameworks to use in making sense of human activity. She thinks critically about knowledge work and how to ensure knowledge isn’t wasted. She revels in tackling the big processes of change, learning and knowing so that ideas become impact. With her colleagues at RHX Group, Helen helps teams make better use of their people, knowledge and information.

Image credit: iStockphoto

Fourth dimension of networking – Concept applied (Part 2)

Recently, I defined a way to examine value in my professional networks, introducing the concept of Fourth dimension networking.

To better quantify and qualify this value, I defined ways to measure ‘return’ on my networking ‘investment’. I looked at what I received, and what I gave in my networking activity.

Quantifying the fundamentals of networking activity

As I networked, I kept records of the following basic data:

  1. No. of individual or group encounters had
  2. No. of people in my network (Source: LinkedIn contacts, Twitter followers, blog followers, and Contacts database)
  3. No. of people who joined my network in a period of time (I typically only retain 3D connections, i.e. people I have met face-to-face and shared an experience with)

NB: ‘Encounters’ were intentional face-to-face contact, and did not include incidental meetings in coffee shops, co-working spaces or train stations. Some individuals were repeat encounters.

I summarised this data for specific time periods to give me a quick snapshot of how much networking I had been doing:

  1. No. of encounters (From 1 Jan – 30 Sep 2012) = 277
    1. Individuals = 205
    2. Groups/events = 72
  2. Increase in my LinkedIn contacts (From 1 Jan – 30 Sep 2012) = 180
  3. No. of people in my network (As at 30 Sep 2012) = Approx 600
    1. LinkedIn = 408
    2. Contacts database (of people not in LinkedIn) = 54
    3. Twitter = 127
    4. RHX Thinking Blog = 9

NB: Twitter and Blog followers overlap with LinkedIn contacts

4D networking criteria list

Now I knew something about the quantity of my networking activity, I still lacked a sense of the quality of what this activity had returned to me. Enter the 4D networking criteria, where a rating is assigned to a person for the networking activity they have done.

WARNING! These are activities (and the order) are for what I value in/from networking. You are invited to define your own list.

ANOTHER WARNING! This list is written in 1st-person for easy reading. I run a risk that the reader perceives this as self-centric. I have some discomfort in taking the perspective about ‘what I received’ as I believe networking is about serving others; however I have more comprehensive data from which to draw upon regarding my ‘received’ experience.

#1  Created opportunities to catch-up with me in person
#2  Suggested a relevant reading, podcast, event, group, role, contact to me; shared knowledge or insights
#3  Actively encouraged, affirmed or validated me in a contextually relevant way
#4  Mentioned, commented or liked a post of mine or included me in a post
#5  Endorsed or recommended me
#6  Introduced me to someone else because I asked
#7  Introduced me to someone else of their own volition
#8  Invited me to be part of a collaboration, strategic alliance or lead participant in event
#9  Asked how to help me and acted on the answer
#10 Offered me work opportunities/referred me to work opportunities

I reflected on networking activity (of which I had been a recipient) for the period 1 Jan – 30 Sep 2012, making a shortlist of people who rated as 4D networkers. I worked through the shortlist assigning each individual a rating. Where an individual got multiple ratings, I assigned the value of the highest rated activity.

HelpingOthersThe results:
From a network of approx 600 people, 16 % (i.e. 92 people) engaged me in 4D activities from 1 Jan – 30 Sep 2012.
Of those 92 people (i.e. 4D-network connections):
18 % rated #1-#3
36 % rated #4-#5
28 % rated #6-#8
7 % rated #9
11 % rated #10

I also noted where I first met a 4D contact to determine which groups or events produced valuable connections. Interestingly, very few higher rating contacts (i.e. 8-10) were first established at professional groups or events. Many higher rating contacts were initially made when working together. It seems contacts with whom I’ve had a deeper work experience are more likely to result in further collaboration.

Helen’s 4D networking under the spotlight

The 4D networking examination above was done retrospectively, coming up with list after activities were preformed and not before. It turned out to be easier to specifically recall what I have received, than what I gave.

To get data for my networking activity, I examined a portion of my email correspondence to aid my recall. While I couldn’t create the same detailed summary, I found evidence that I had done all the activities in the list multiple times. From anecdotal feedback, I know what I have done has been appreciated by others, and in some cases inspired them to do the same for others in their network.

What to conclude?

My business partner (he’s a numbers person) looks at the figures of 277 encounters resulting in 23 offers of collaboration/strategic alliance (#8) or work (#10), and calculates that 8% of those encounters were ‘worthwhile’ in cool business terms. In the current economic climate that hasn’t translated into exciting revenue figures.

Networking doesn’t always have obvious returns but that’s not a reason not to do it. It can be resource intensive work, so I recognise I must invest time and energy resources prudently. Knowing what activities are worth doing allows me to better prepare and conduct myself. (More on this to come in the Part 3 blog post on 4D networking)

I invest with faith: My networking actions are seeds sown that are not guaranteed to germinate. Nevertheless, I believe that generous thoughtful actions, though small, cultivate a sharing and caring network culture.

I trust that doing 4D networking activity inspires others to act. Let me know if you are so inspired.

Helen Palmer is Principal Consultant at RHX GroupHelen likes to experiment and create conceptual frameworks to use in making sense of human activity. She thinks critically about knowledge work and how to ensure knowledge isn’t wasted. She revels in tackling the big processes of change, learning and knowing so that ideas become impact. With her colleagues at RHX Group, Helen helps teams make better use of their people, knowledge and information.

Image credit: stock.xchng

Fourth Dimension Networking – A Concept (Part 1)

Many professionals would claim to know and utilise the value of the connections in their network. Yet most invest time, energy and cups of coffee in creating a network, only to let it languish on a forgotten LinkedIn account or as a stack of dusty business cards.

Not all networking is equal and certainly not all networkers are equal. After two years of intensive networking, I’ve developed a schema that outlines how to cultivate a potent professional network.

Fourth dimension networking is a concept that empowers you to realise greater benefit with your network.

Common networking – where most professionals stop

Most business professionals engage in low-impact networking. They meet someone at an event; exchange business cards and basic professional details (i.e. what you do, where you work, what experience and expertise you have); then connect through social media (i.e. Twitter, LinkedIn or Facebook), with some or no ongoing personal dialogue.

This kind of networking fails to realise the depth of knowledge, networks and capabilities of the people in the network.

Activating your network – become a leader

Network of connected peopleYour network is a resource of knowledge and action. It could sit latently with unrealised power, or you could assume leadership to activate the network and catalyse that power.

Your network is a collection of people with whom you have a relationship and to whom you can offer your knowledge, experience, skill and contacts.

So ask not what your network can do for you, but what you can do for your network?

Networking taken to the next level – the fourth dimension

The depth and richness of a network can be defined by looking at its dimensions. Network dimensions encapsulate the depth of knowledge held about a person.

Initially, deep networking appears to be a three dimensional concept, where the third dimension reveals the substance of a person beyond a mere name and face. However, there is a fourth dimension to networking that incorporates movement and action, where the capability of people is activated.

Network dimensions defined

One dimension (1D): A name and an email address; often in an email/newsletter list

Two dimensions (2D): A name, a face and some personal details; what you get from a brief meeting where business cards were exchanged

Three dimensions (3D): A name with a face, personal details and a personal sense or experience of a person; the result of a one-to-one conversation or a shared experience like a conference or committee; some bonding has taken place

Four dimensions (4D): Deeper knowledge of a person sufficient to access their stocks of knowledge (e.g. what-is, who-is, how-to, etc), and to participate in their flows of knowledge (e.g. collaboration or conversation); actively contributing to the other and their network; leading and leveraging with action

Short description of the four dimensions of networking

Uncommon networking – more to the fourth dimension

Fourth dimension networking’s richness is based on how it incorporates action and progressive movement. In this dimension there is purposeful intent to do activity of value to others, to catalyse goodness for and within the network, and to enable doing good with the network.

Within the fourth dimension, there are many levels of practical activity for the savvy networker. I have developed a list of value to me.

Levels within the fourth dimension network: Helen’s List

The items below are ranked and the higher numbers have greater value.

0  Responded/approached me/them of own volition with an explicit intent to keep in touch
1  Created opportunities to catch up with me/them in person to learn about them/me
2  Suggested a relevant reading, podcast, event, group, role, contact to me/them; shared knowledge or insights
3  Actively encouraged, affirmed or validated me/them in contextually relevant way
4  Mentioned me/them in a post; commented or Liked a post of mine/theirs
5  Endorsed or recommended me/them
6  Introduced me/them to someone else because I/they asked
7  Introduced me/them to someone else of own volition
8  Invited me/them to be part of a collaboration, strategic alliance or lead participant in event
9  Asked how to help me/them and acted on the answer
10 Offered me/them work

The levels can be customised and ranked according to personal preference.

A knowledge focus in fourth dimension networking

There is a knowledge management angle to fourth dimension networking: Managing your network with a knowledge focus.

Far more than just an information source, network contacts are a significant resource of rich, contextual and highly dynamic knowledge. The value of that knowledge is unlocked by actions and through relationships that mobilises knowledge for the benefit of all.

A network is a rich knowledge-base of many classes of knowledge: what-is; how-to; why-it-is-so; who-is; who-has; where-is; -when-is; what-happened etc. It can be a significant form of social capital where ‘who-you-know’ is often more highly prized rather than ‘what-you-know’.

A network can be a vehicle for the creation of personal and collective knowledge, as well as the distribution of knowledge that might be applied more widely.

I have consciously and carefully co-created my network so the preconditions for knowledge sharing are more prevalent: trust, respect and rapport through shared values and common frames of reference.

Want to ask me something? I may not know the answer but I’ve got about 600 people I can ask instantly who might.

Where to from here?

I am using this concept to examine my networking practice and the power in my network. In Part 2 of this series, I report on my findings. In Part 3, I share insights about what practices, tools and mindsets are useful for being a 4D Networker.

Join me on the journey of improving your networking performance. Spectators and participants both welcome.

Helen Palmer is Principal Consultant at RHX Group. She thinks critically about knowledge work, and how to ensure knowledge isn’t wasted. She revels in tackling the big processes of change and learning so that ideas become impact. With her colleagues at RHX Group, Helen helps individuals and teams make better use of their contacts, knowledge and information.

Networking Image credit: iStockphoto

Knowledge in little packages

Knowledge, from experience and of insight, can be powerfully distilled into a few words.  There is a large published knowledge-base of sage words in the form of aphorisms available to humanity. With famous and unknown composers, these pithy phrases are a handy package for disseminating memorable thought.

Some favourite aphorisms

I curate a personal collection of aphorisms and quotes. Here is a small selection of favourites from historical figures.

It is insufficiently considered how much of human life passes in little incidents.
~ Samuel Johnson

The reasonable man adapts himself to the world. The unreasonable man adapts the world to himself. All progress depends upon the unreasonable man.
~ George Bernard Shaw

If you hold a cat by the tail you learn things you cannot learn any other way.
~ Mark Twain

If the only tool you have is a hammer, you tend to see every problem as a nail.
~ Abraham Maslow

Give me six hours to chop down a tree and I will spend the first four sharpening the axe.
~ Abraham Lincoln

Tweeting

Tweeting, with a maximum of 140 characters, is a publishing medium that lends itself to cultivating and disseminating the common person’s insights. I choose to follow a small group of Tweeters, as I am interested in insightful and stimulating content rather than the mundane. Here’s some of my favourite recent tweets.

@CreatvEmergence Michelle James
Be vigilant with your mission. Be exuberant with your passion. Be gentle with yourself.

@CreatvEmergence Michelle James
Resonance: a time-saving way to make decisions, connections and purposeful choices

@CDEgger Christine Egger
Time to build this into every day: putting the laptop aside for a 15-min #deepdive

As a new Tweeter, I decided to focus on composing Tweets that aim to be insightful and stimulating. Here’s some of my recent compositions (@helenrhx).

For many ‘truths’, there is a true ‘opposite’: Paralysis by analysis. Fools rush in.

Einstein said: “Technological change is like an axe in the hands of a pathological criminal.” Was he wrong?

Don’t stand there, do something. Don’t do something, stand there. Same words. Different meaning. Order matters. Semantics!

Wondering: If we had to pay postage for each email, would we write/receive better quality email messages?

Written by Helen Palmer, Principal Consultant at RHX Group.